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Annie Get Your Gun!

Here’s a story that’s not about viruses or business closing.

When the folks down the street at Coastal Environmental Systems were packing up their Seattle office back in February, preparing for a move, they had to figure out what to do with a rather large sign that had been hanging around in their basement since the 1980’s. So they sent a picture to the Alliance for Pioneer Square on the chance that they’d know of someone in the neighborhood who might want it. Chris Woodward sent the picture to Jane, who said, well…..YESSSSS we want it.

This gigantic stretched canvas, painted in latex paint, was the show poster for the Skid Road Show’s production of the musical Annie Get Your Gun right here in our basement (current home to Beneath the Streets). We’re pretty sure it was displayed under the awning above the stairs, above the very steep stairs leading to the theatre. Jane and Steve lugged the giant canvas back to its original home here, parading it through Occidental Square one sunny day this winter. (The photo is taken pre-Covid, which we now have to say whenever people look dangerously close). It’s in storage for now while renovations continue downstairs, making way for Beneath the Streets’ expansion and RE-OPENING. Beneath the Streets plans to display it in the basement when they resume their operations in October.

The company’s founder Don Munro had been a big supporter of the Skid Road Show back in the day, as well as practically inventing Seattle’s Metro transit system. Thank you Don! Rest in power.

Adorable micro-storefront available in the Good Arts Arcade

A storefront with full-height windows facing Cherry Street is available for rent October 1. This charming space opens on to retail arcade with a sitting area, furniture, and art. The adjoining tenants are Sew Generously Bespoke, a master tailor, and Lolo’s Hair Design. The dedicated space is 185 square feet; full use of the shared space (arcade, bathrooms, and kitchenette) is included in the rent of $700 .

The Good Arts Arcade was established in the Good Arts Building in 2017 to provide affordable space for the making, exhibiting, and selling of a range of creative goods, and foster a supportive community for the makers and sellers.

Flanked by the anchor location of Cherry Street Coffee House to the west, and the entrance to ’57 Biscayne Artist Studios to the east, Good Arts Arcade is perfectly situated for creative collaboration, fabulous combined events, and synergistic marketing opportunities. The location is well situated for foot traffic from the nearby light rail station, ferries, and Pioneer Square park.

We are seeking creative community builders—artists, gallerists, human-scale retailers—to work, grow, and collaborate in the Arcade. Contact: David Pew of Sew Generously for details and viewing. (He holds the master lease and is moving into the adjoining space.)

The Art Wall is now public. What a great time to buy art.

The Salon Rue de Cerise, our swanky guest suite on the third floor, comes with its own gallery show, hung salon-style, of course. Until now, the show was exclusively for guests, and guests alone could purchase the art, through our top-secret shop page.

Our mission as a building is to support artists and other micro-businesses that contribute to our city’s vitality. The proceeds from the Salon Rue de Cerise help us keep the art studio rents below market rate. We also use it to promotes the rich culture of Seattle and Pioneer Square, encouraging guests to support the local arts scene. At the moment the Salon is sadly guest-less, and will remain so until social distancing orders are dialed back to the point that people are again visiting Seattle.

To help generate some income for Seattle’s artists, and make sure there’s a culture to come back to when all this is over, we’re opening the gallery up to the public for a limited time. We have some very affordable art by many beloved Seattle artists* that we’ll ship to your home for free. Simply visit the shop page, find something to fall in love with, and we’ll make it happen.

*Juan Alonso Rodriguez, Daniel Carrillo, Jed Dunkerley, Eric Eschenbach, Henrietta’s Eye, Elizabeth Arzani, Karey Kessler, Krisna Schumann, Dara Solliday, Jane Richlovsky, and Nathan Vass, to name a few.

October 24: Bad Bishop grand opening & ’57 Biscayne industry night

Our newest Good Arts addition, on First Avenue next to Cherry Street Coffee House, Bad Bishop Bar, will open Wednesday, October 24 for cocktails and eats. We’ll keep the secret passage open that same night for ’57 Biscayne’s 100 under $100/Sweet Suite 300 Industry Night and artists’ reception, so guests can pop down for a bite of food, or up for a bite of art.

Wednesday, October 24

110 Cherry Street AND 704 First Avenue (with secret passage!)

’57 Biscayne event is from 5-7; Bad Bishop’s until 9

Congrats to Bad Bishop owner Jesse for this nice write-up in Seattle Met. And to our second-newest retail tenant, Sew Generously, joining H Bailey Boutique vintage menswear in the quest to make the men of Seattle, and anyone else, look fabulous. (108 Cherry in the Arcade)

 

Stay at the Salon Rue de Cerise

New Airbnb spot offers unique experience – while benefitting local artists

For those who dream of a night at the museum, a little more time uninterrupted in a gallery or a completely unique stay, the Good Arts Building has you covered.

A new Airbnb room, with space for up to two guests, is opening its doors in the ’57 Biscayne studio complex located at 110 Cherry St. in Pioneer Square – just in time for Seattle Art Fair.

Named “Salon Rue de Cerise,” the space was inspired by Gertrude Stein’s living room on the Rue de Fleurus, with its walls hung floor to ceiling with paintings by as-yet-unknown artists, an inspiring space for conversation and new ideas.

By staying for the night, guests will also be lending a helping hand to the local art scene. Overnight rentals will help subsidize the building’s art studios – unlike other Airbnb units, which have drawn criticism for replacing affordable housing.

“This is about helping artists stay in the middle of the city,” founder and artist Jane Richlovsky said. “It’s supporting artists working in Pioneer Square.”

Typically (and even stereotypically), artists give a boost to a struggling area and are later priced out. Instead, at the Good Arts Building, Richlovsky is creating a new model, one that encourages creatives to stay in the neighborhood they revitalized.

“Artists are good for the economy,” she said. “I like to think we’re good for other things as well, but the economy gets peoples’ attention.”

The Good Arts building has a rich history, entrenched in the arts, to maintain, after all. There once was a world famous jazz club in its walls, a fringe theatre in its basement and a photography studio in the halls. It also housed a boxing gym and the first gay and lesbian community center in Seattle.

Richlovsky and other studio artists are hanging a secret art show in the Airbnb room. Only guests will be able to view and purchase the work, priced affordably, through an online store and have it sent to their homes.

Guests will also have a large window view of Pioneer Square. “You’re right in the middle of it all,” Richlovsky said. “There’s a lot to do in the neighborhood.”

Guests staying at the Salon Rue de Cerise will receive a binder of recommended stops and experiences in Pioneer Square – as well as a few special options in nearby artists’ studios and retail boutiques.

Richlovsky has maintained a studio in Pioneer Square since 2001. She founded ’57 Biscayne in 2011 to offer affordable workspaces for her fellow evictees of the storied 619 Western arts building and also to maintain the presence of artists in Pioneer Square. She took advantage of the neighborhood’s then low rental rates and her DOT relocation funds to secure the second-floor master- lease specifically to provide affordable art studios.

“In Seattle, as in so many cities across the country, artists and arts businesses have set the foundation for struggling neighborhoods to transform into highly desirable real estate markets, only to be priced out of them once this happens,” Richlovsky said.

In 2015, the artist-developer partnership Good Arts LLC formed to buy the entire building, to keep the artists in Pioneer Square and to provide additional affordable space for the creation, promotion, and exhibition of a broad range of artistic endeavors.

In keeping with its mission, the Good Arts Building recently repurposed its third floor – once office space for the tech industry – into more studios.

Want to stay in the Good Arts Building? Book it here.

Photo by Jeanie Lewis

One lovely large studio is available at ’57 Biscayne

In keeping with our mission of making more affordable space creative entrepreneurs of all stripes, we recently renovated our third floor into art studios. Creative work space being at a premium in this town, it took about five minutes for eleven of them to get snatched up. The largest one is still available, and we’re looking for the perfect anchor tenant for this buzzing hive of activity.

It would make a perfect printmaking, photography, or other shared workshop space. Thinking of starting or moving such a venture? Here are some of the many advantages to locating your fabulous maker space in the Good Arts Building:

 

Stability: ’57 Biscayne studios, which occupy the upper floors, encompass an established community of artists.The building, since 2015, has been owned by a partnership that includes artists, and which is committed to providing space to creative tenants as affordably as possible.

 

Location: Centrally located; convenient to buses, light rail, ferries. It’s on the route of the Pioneer Square Art Walk, the oldest one in the country. First-floor retail & restaurants in the building attract foot traffic, from tourists to techies.

 

Community: This is the big one. ’57 Biscayne was founded in 2011 by a group of displaced artists in a tight spot, who found that working together was the best way to survive. Today, twenty-eight studios host a mix of fine, applied, and commercial artists and artisans, young and established, who share ideas, tips, techniques, and business savvy, to their mutual benefit. Collaborative teams have been born here.

 

Vision: In a changing art business landscape, where galleries frequently close and cannot be counted on to support artists financially, an artist-run enterprise that puts artists first is the only way we stand a chance. The Good Arts Building has strong ties to the larger community—tech firms, developers, architects, charitable non-profits—and we’re not afraid to use them to develop new markets and come up with innovative ways for people to purchase art. The Good Arts partners have placed their money, time, and reputations toward keeping the creative class centrally located and thriving in the twenty-first century. And we’re only getting started. (Up next: a theatre in the basement!)

 

Perks of being artist-run: Proper utility sinks, natural (skylights!!) and gallery lighting, and other details that artists know you need. Artists’ schedules are welcome. As are dogs. A lovely hallway gallery for exhibits. A parklet is coming to the Cherry Street side of the building that is a great blank slate for art events, mini-classes, installations, urban gardening, or just hanging out. An Air B&B space is in the works on the property; special rates will be available to tenants’ clients, friends, & family.

 

Visibility: Because of the uniqueness of our vision, the timeliness of our mission, and the unusual nature of the collaboration between an artist and developer (natural enemies in the wild), we’ve received our share of attention in the press. Reporters who have written about us continue to follow and keep in touch, to see where this great experiment will lead.

Photos and other info about the space are on the ’57 Biscayne blog.

Coming May 3: “You Are Here, Too” and a big fat Open House

You Are Here, Too opens Thursday, May 3 at the Good Arts Gallery.

In a city in which the ground has literally shifted several times over the past hundred years from seismic activity and human intervention, and continues to shift through highway projects and rampant development, maps can provide a link to the shared past and a record of the layers underneath.

You Are Here Too, an exhibition of artists’ responses to maps and mapping, opens May 3, 2018, continuing through August 30, at the Good Arts Building in Pioneer Square. The show is divided between two galleries within the building: Good Arts Gallery, inside Cherry Street Coffee House at 700 First Avenue, and ’57 Biscayne Artist Studios, upstairs at 110 Cherry Street (maps provided onsite). You Are Here, Too is co-curated by artists Annie Brule and Jane Richlovsky. Brule is also a cartographer.

Incorporating actual maps, or images, typography, and constructs borrowed from maps, the artworks in the show trace the topography of the natural world, political boundaries, the built environment, slavery, motherhood, and more. Artists working in diverse media—paintings, drawings, layered collages, embroidery, digital media, and ceramics—include David Francis, Nia Michaels, Dara Solliday, Joseph Pentheroudakis, Dawn Endean, Savina Mason, Morgan Cahn, Beverly Naidus, Elizabeth Arzani, Ann Marie Schneider, Hadar Iron, Lindsay Peyton, Warren Munzel, Marie Abando, Ann Marie Schneider, and Karey Kessler.

Like visual art itself, maps are an agreed-upon, yet arbitrary representation of real things; they are abstract metaphors for real places. In a lifetime of experiencing the world through these metaphors, maps and the actual places they represent start to layer themselves on top of one another in the mind of the navigator.

The layering effect is reflected in the very location of You Are Here, Too: Beloved local institution Metsker Maps occupied the footprint of Good Arts Gallery, purveying maps there from 1986-2004. Digging deeper into the layers, the ground on which the building sits was a center of commerce for the Duwamish, and Seattle’s original coastline.

The First Thursday opening reception will be held on May 3, from 6-9 PM, along with our first building-wide open house. Artists’ studios will be open to the public at ’57 Biscayne (110 Cherry), including the new third-floor expansion, and inside the Good Arts Arcade at 108 Cherry. We’ll have live piano music by Victor Janusz in the second-floor lobby.

Image: Orientation / Sand Earth, Ann Marie Schneider; photography, digital media, custom printing technique; limited edition giclee print

“The Devil Showed Up Early”

. . . to Cherry Street Coffee House. He probably just wanted a cup of coffee.

Actually, that’s the name of an art show, our second one at the Good Arts Gallery, nestled in the upper level of Cherry Street Coffee House. Every two months, ’57 Biscayne proprietrix Jane Richlovsky teams up with a different guest co-curator to put together a new exhibit. This month’s co-curator, Hen Chung of RAD AND HUNGRY, brings us paintings by Mike Tidwell.

“The Devil Showed Up Early” opens January 4 with a First Thursday reception from 5-7:30 and continues through February.

If God and the Devil met on Earth to battle against one another, I’ve always imagined it would take place in the American Deep South. With probably more churches than schools, one could argue the South is setting the stage for a confrontation of “good vs. evil”.

Growing up in small town Alabama, The Devil Showed Up Early is a series inspired by places from my childhood. It’s always felt like there was something sinister happening below the surface – a supernatural eeriness. Dig deep into the soil, and there’s beauty born from the Deep South’s past despite its twisted history. And of course, the Devil would show up early.

Mike Tidwell

Oodles of art throughout the building: First Thursday, September 7

This month marks a new milestone in the transformation of the Good Arts Building, and we’re celebrating with art events all over the building. The long-awaited new Cherry Street Coffee House is finally, gorgeously open on the corner and will stay open into the evening, serving wine and beer. Up the block at 108 Cherry, the Good Arts Arcade sports new studios and retail space.

Upstairs, ’57 Biscayne will present the fourth annual 100 under $100 show, which is just like it sounds, 100 works of art priced under $100 each. Tiny paintings, exquisite ink drawings, collages, tin constructions, photographs, and more, all ready to take home by the lucky buyers. You can also tour the open studios and sip a glass of wine while the excellent and suave Victor Janusz serenades you with standards on the piano.

Inside Cherry Street Coffee House, on the mezzanine level, the Good Arts Gallery will debut with C.Y.: Selected Work by ’57 Biscayne Artists. The venue will feature rotating exhibitions organized by ’57 Biscayne proprietrix Jane Richlovsky and a cast of guest curators.

In the newly renovated Arcade, at 108 Cherry Street, guest artist Fernando Sancho will present selections from his series of photographs African Dream Academy (featured above), as a pop-up in the large gallery space (we’re currently reviewing art/retail concept proposals for a permanent tenant). The new studio tenants of the Arcade, Gina Grey & Ieva Ansaberga are also cooking up a show in the back!

Thursday, September 7

110 Cherry Street, 108 Cherry Street, 700 1st Ave.

5-9 PM

The Good Arts Arcade: Creative retail & maker spaces for lease

In keeping with its mission to support artists and other creative entrepreneurs, Good Arts is in the process of remodeling a street-level storefront into two retail spaces and two artists’ studios, all of which open onto a shared central gallery.

The Arcade will provide affordable space for the making, exhibiting, and selling of a range of creative goods, and foster a supportive community for the makers and sellers.

Flanked by the new Cherry Street Coffee House to the west, and the entrance to ’57 Biscayne Artist Studios to the east, Good Arts Arcade is perfectly situated for creative collaboration, fabulous combined events, and synergistic marketing opportunities. The location is well situated for foot traffic from the nearby light rail station, ferries, Pioneer Square park, and a planned streetcar stop at First and Cherry. A parklet will be installed on the street in front of the entrance, providing additional outdoor community space and a potential pop-up show venue.

We are seeking creative community builders–artists, gallerists, and human-scale retailers–to work, grow, and collaborate in the Arcade.

The spaces will be available September 1 and are still under construction: interior photos will be coming soon. This PDF has a floor plan, square footages, and prices: GoodArtsArcade. Please contact Jane to see the spaces in progress. On First Thursday, August 3, you can get a sneak peek at one of them, when we host Neon Dreamer, an art-meets-video-game pop-up.

opening1

This area, shown with a pop-up show in May 2017, will become the larger of the two gallery spaces.

heather2

The future Arcade as one large space, playing host to the Upstream Music Fest in May 2017.

Neon Dreamer: Interactive Pac-man Pop-up Installation all the way from Prague!

The Good Arts Building welcomes Czech artist Edita Pattova, presenting Neon Dreamer, an interactive painting and video installation, on the first stop of its West Coast tour. Neon Dreamer will be up for one night only, Thursday, August 3, from 5-9 PM in the under-construction Good Arts Arcade at 108 Cherry Street.

Inspired by the neon lights of Times Square on a visit to New York, Edita created a grid of nine oil paintings depicting an imaginary American city. On it, she projects an original video game, inspired by Pac-man, which visitors can play singly or competitively, becoming the dreamers chasing their dreams, beer, money, and each other through the neon-lit painted city streets, while dodging the authorities and other hazards.

Original Hits by Original Artists & Upstream Music in a Good Arts Pop-up

R.I.P. the album cover, sort of. We said our goodbyes to that roomy square-foot of substantial cardstock, with its fantastic artwork — maybe by Warhol or Dali or Mapplethorpe —to name just a few. We also said our goodbyes to the hours of contemplation of the cover-art while the music spun on a nearby turntable, a unique synthesis of the aural with the visual with the tactile — a feast for the soul. Then the album cover was demoted in both size and importance, a mere afterthought of a booklet cover, encased in brittle plastic. Now stripped of its physicality entirely, it’s relegated to the ether where its low-rez pixelated remains live out their diminished existence barely visible on tiny hand-held screens. Until now! With LP sales now at a twenty-eight-year high, the album cover (both genuine and fake) is back!

Original Hits by Original Artists, opening May 4 at the Good Arts Building, will pay proper homage to the art of the album cover, both past and present—without the album. The exhibit features covers for dozens of fabricated albums cut by bands that exist only in the artists’ imaginations. The show will be on view May 4 – May 31, 2017 in our 108 Cherry Street storefront, downstairs from ’57 Biscayne & next door to the future home of Cherry Street Coffee House.

A Release Party and reception for the artists will be held First Thursday, May 4, 6:00 -10:00 p.m. followed by the Upstream Music Fest, May 11-13, when there will be actual live (if unrelated) music on site, programmed by Upstream during the run of the festival. One of a handful of free venues in the neighborhood, it will be open from 4-8PM on May 11 & 12; and 1PM-8PM (music 4-8PM only) on May 13. Beer and snacks will be available for purchase during the festival courtesy of co-owner Cherry Street Coffee House. The exhibit will also be open on the last two Fridays and Saturdays in May, from 1-6PM and by appointment.

Original Hits is co-curated by artists Jane Richlovsky and Dara Solliday of ’57 Biscayne studios which, incidentally, were named for a Joni Mitchell song lyric. For this show Richlovsky and Solliday invited approximately thirty-three and one third artists to unearth those long-forgotten catch phrases that had once sparked a reply of “That would make a great band name!” and then create a full-size old-school 12-inch LP album cover for this hypothetical hitmaker. Artists include Romson Bustillo, Kelly Lyles, Nia Michaels, Jed Dunkerley, Gabriel Campanario, Richlovsky, and Solliday, showing fake album covers in paint, collage, repurposed tin, textiles, wood, and who knows what else.

Coming soon: The newest Cherry Street Coffee House, Upstream Music Fest, AND the art of the album cover

Watch this space! Construction began this week for the new Cherry Street Coffee House in the southwest corner of the Good Arts Building. Three spaces are being combined, the former Cafe Bengodi plus two adjacent storefronts that once housed Metzger Maps and, in more recent memory, a bar featuring naked sushi.

Good Arts denizens ’57 Biscayne Studios will present Original Hits by Original Artists as the inaugural exhibit in the new space: Opening May 4,  the show will pay proper homage to the art of the album cover, both past and present—without the album. The exhibit features covers for approximately 33-1/3  fabricated albums cut by bands that exist only in the artists’ imaginations. On view May 4 – May 31, 2017 in the future home of Cherry Street Coffee House, 700 1st Avenue.

A Release Party and reception for the artists will be held First Thursday, May 4, 6:00 -10:00 p.m. followed by the Upstream Music Fest, May 11-13, when there will be actual live (if unrelated) music on site, programmed by Upstream during the run of the festival. (One of a handful of free venues in the neighborhood.)

originalhits

Naughtiness at the Good Arts Building

There’s a peepshow at the Good Arts Building. If you should happen to glance over at the window as you walk by 108 Cherry Street, you might catch a glimpse of a gyrating silhouette through the cutouts in the blacked-out windows. Step right up and take a closer look, and leave your noseprint with all the others on the window.

Amanda James Parker’s Ghosts II is an iteration of an earlier site-specific video installation, Ghosts of Flesh Avenue. Inspired by the artist’s experience as a dancer at an iconic, now extinct Seattle peep show, Ghosts II pays homage to downtown Seattle’s checkered history as a skid row and red light district, the evidence of which is rapidly being washed away to make way for a shinier, cleaned-up downtown. Artist, art model, longtime associate of ’57 Biscayne, Parker created the original video to project at the former site of the defunct Lusty Lady strip club, just down the road from us on First Avenue. She needed a place to shoot a video of naked people dancing, and Good Arts had an open space to lend her. She hung a translucent scrim from the ceiling and invited a bunch of her former stripper pals to dance together once again, filming their ghostly silhouettes through the fabric.

fleshavenueweb

Parker first projected the video onto the walls of the old Lusty Lady last September, setting up a dance floor for patrons to join them. The more voyeuristically-inclined could watch through holes in a nearby wall. Jen Graves wrote about the piece in the Stranger.

Ghosts of Flesh Avenue was slated to run at the Lusty Lady for just a month but, our building being no slacker in the sleazy-past department, we invited her to remount the video piece at the Good Arts Building in the same storefront where she’d shot the original footage. Ghosts II had its Cherry Street debut in December 2016, and is now running 24/7 for several months, until construction begins for the Good Arts Arcade gallery and studios. Best time to see it is after dark, but come take a peep any time. C’mon, you know you want to.

ghosts2ghostsday2

The Artist and the Developer

Last spring, UW Professor Jeff Schulman interviewed some of the Good Arts partners for his Seattle Growth Podcast. He hadn’t used much of our material in the original series, (we got pre-empted by the mayor, whatever), but then a couple of days ago Jeff wrote us:
“With all the divisiveness in country, I felt like now was a good time to share the powerful story of the good that can come from approaching challenges and community members with an open mind.”
The story of the Good Arts Building is, literally, A Very Special Episode of the Seattle Growth Podcast:The Artist and the Developer, available on iTunes. It’s a half-hour and very uplifting, even if we do say so ourselves.

Getting ready for our new look!

The Good Arts Building is being wrapped in scaffolding this week, in preparation for a major exterior refurbishment. The new colors, designed by Jane Richlovsky with input from other artists of ’57 Biscayne, and approved by the Pioneer Square Preservation Board this past summer, will highlight the unique Victorian decoration on the building’s trim and complement the brick and sandstone facade.

southelevationwebRendering of the Cherry Street elevation of the building.

westelevationwebRendering of the First Avenue elevation.

Good Arts Building featured on KPLU radio

KPLU reporter Monica Spain visited the Good Arts Building last week to chat with Jane Richlovsky and guest artist Gabriel Campanario about Placiness, the exhibit now on view at ’57 Biscayne on the second floor of Good Arts. Hear or read the story here.

Placiness features artwork inspired by the buildings, history, landscape, and humanscape of Seattle. Paintings, drawings, and photographs directly confronting the cityscape, constructions incorporating materials endemic to the region and more. Through August 28.

Photo of Juan Alonso‘s Town Hall digital prints by Jane Richlovsky

Art Pop-ups (and the party) Continue Through August

Seattle Art Fair has ended, but the party at the Good Arts Building is just getting started. The pop-up galleries we’re hosting in the building, as well as the upstairs art studios, will continue programming cultural wonders through August.

The exhibition Placiness at ’57 Biscayne, upstairs at 110 Cherry, will be on view through August 28, open Fridays & Saturdays 1-6  (and most weekdays but an appointment is recommended). Hours and details here.

La Sala, around the corner at 702 First Avenue, has a full line-up of poetry and music events on the weekends in August, while their visual arts exhibit will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12-5 through August 30. Full schedule at lasalapresentslacocina.com.

Meanwhile, at the Center on Contemporary Art, 106 Cherry, What You See is What You Sweat flips cultural appropriation around and builds relationships between communities of color where whiteness is not the center, through a diverse array of media from video and textiles to paintings and photographs. Through August, Thursdays through Saturdays 1-7.

(photo courtesy La Sala)

Good Arts gearing up for Art Fair Weekend

Good Arts will be home to three pop-up galleries this weekend, in addition to a freshly-spruced-up ’57 Biscayne.

Above, ’57 Biscayne artists transform the upstairs lobby and install Placiness.

Cherry Street Coffee House viewed through our new neon sign

Cherry Street Coffee House viewed through our new neon sign

 

Good Arts sign guarded by attack chihuahua while awaiting installation

Good Arts sign guarded by attack chihuahua while awaiting installation

 

Placiness: Art inspired by Seattle

The Good Arts Building is dedicated to preserving space for artists to create in the middle of the city. Most people we talk to agree that it’s a great thing to make sure artists stay in the city. But what about the art they make there? Why do the artists themselves want to stay and make their work in Seattle?

Placiness, an exhibit curated by Good Arts partner Jane Richlovsky, opens August 4 at ‘57 Biscayne on the second floor of the Good Arts Building. The show gathers visual evidence of what it actually means–from the artists’ points of view–to live and work in Seattle, to move about the city and to look at things and people. Featured guest artists include Seattle Sketcher Gabriel Campanario, Juan Alonso, Molly Magai, the late Drake Deknatel and more.

The show will run concurrent with the Seattle Art Fair, August 4-7, at 110 Cherry Street in Pioneer Square. An Artists’ Reception will be held Saturday, August 6 from 5-8 PM. Hours during the fair are First Thursday August 4, 5-8 PM; Fri/Sat. 12-8 PM; Sun. 1-6 PM

In keeping with its mission, Good Arts has signed on as an Event Partner to the Seattle Art Fair, and is hosting a Fair venue downstairs from the studios. In addition, the Good Arts Building is providing storefront space to La Sala Latino/a Artists Network and the Center on Contemporary Art; these groups are independently organizing concurrent events.

What’s up with the boxing gloves?

If you were to look up as you walked past the Good Arts Building, you might notice that our flower baskets aren’t hanging from the standard-issue Pioneer Square brackets. Two of the buildings’ owners designed and built these brackets to pay homage to some of the characters and institutions from the building’s colorful history.

Schelles’ Grotto, a notorious speakeasy (and worse) occupied the basement at the turn of the last century; several other saloons existed on the first floor over the years, including the Yankee Clipper Tavern.

Hershberg Men’s Clothiers were among the building’s first tenants; their highly visible signage dominates the corner in early photos.

Wolf’s Good Eats Cafeteria, whose name is emblazoned on the building in photos from the teens (and the inspiration for our name), occupied both second and third floors. The cup also marks the future location of Cherry Street Coffee House!

The Skid Road Theatre (1975-1980) was an important part of Seattle’s (and Pioneer Square’s) theatrical history; actors and directors who went on to shape local professional theatre worked there in their early years.

The 102 Cherry Club (basement, 1940’s) figures prominently in Se- attle jazz history as the club where visiting acts would wind down and play casual, unadvertised sets after public mainstage shows elsewhere. Our future plans involve restoring the basement to a performance space.

The Evergreen boxing gym occupied the third floor in the 1940’s -’60’s. Among the memorable quotes attributed to ts irrepressible proprietor, George Chemeres: “I lived by the sweat of my imagination” – which also happens to be an appropriate motto for the current second-floor occupant, ’57 Biscayne art studios.

An early sketch for the design

An early sketch for the design

discs, welding, steve coulter, pioneer square, good arts

The waterjet-cut steel discs awaiting assembly

clamped

A bracket assembled and ready for welding.

welding

Good Arts co-owner Steve Coulter welding a bracket.