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Stay at the Salon Rue de Cerise

New Airbnb spot offers unique experience – while benefitting local artists

For those who dream of a night at the museum, a little more time uninterrupted in a gallery or a completely unique stay, the Good Arts Building has you covered.

A new Airbnb room, with space for up to two guests, is opening its doors in the ’57 Biscayne studio complex located at 110 Cherry St. in Pioneer Square – just in time for Seattle Art Fair.

Named “Salon Rue de Cerise,” the space was inspired by Gertrude Stein’s living room on the Rue de Fleurus, with its walls hung floor to ceiling with paintings by as-yet-unknown artists, an inspiring space for conversation and new ideas.

By staying for the night, guests will also be lending a helping hand to the local art scene. Overnight rentals will help subsidize the building’s art studios – unlike other Airbnb units, which have drawn criticism for replacing affordable housing.

“This is about helping artists stay in the middle of the city,” founder and artist Jane Richlovsky said. “It’s supporting artists working in Pioneer Square.”

Typically (and even stereotypically), artists give a boost to a struggling area and are later priced out. Instead, at the Good Arts Building, Richlovsky is creating a new model, one that encourages creatives to stay in the neighborhood they revitalized.

“Artists are good for the economy,” she said. “I like to think we’re good for other things as well, but the economy gets peoples’ attention.”

The Good Arts building has a rich history, entrenched in the arts, to maintain, after all. There once was a world famous jazz club in its walls, a fringe theatre in its basement and a photography studio in the halls. It also housed a boxing gym and the first gay and lesbian community center in Seattle.

Richlovsky and other studio artists are hanging a secret art show in the Airbnb room. Only guests will be able to view and purchase the work, priced affordably, through an online store and have it sent to their homes.

Guests will also have a large window view of Pioneer Square. “You’re right in the middle of it all,” Richlovsky said. “There’s a lot to do in the neighborhood.”

Guests staying at the Salon Rue de Cerise will receive a binder of recommended stops and experiences in Pioneer Square – as well as a few special options in nearby artists’ studios and retail boutiques.

Richlovsky has maintained a studio in Pioneer Square since 2001. She founded ’57 Biscayne in 2011 to offer affordable workspaces for her fellow evictees of the storied 619 Western arts building and also to maintain the presence of artists in Pioneer Square. She took advantage of the neighborhood’s then low rental rates and her DOT relocation funds to secure the second-floor master- lease specifically to provide affordable art studios.

“In Seattle, as in so many cities across the country, artists and arts businesses have set the foundation for struggling neighborhoods to transform into highly desirable real estate markets, only to be priced out of them once this happens,” Richlovsky said.

In 2015, the artist-developer partnership Good Arts LLC formed to buy the entire building, to keep the artists in Pioneer Square and to provide additional affordable space for the creation, promotion, and exhibition of a broad range of artistic endeavors.

In keeping with its mission, the Good Arts Building recently repurposed its third floor – once office space for the tech industry – into more studios.

Want to stay in the Good Arts Building? Book it here.

Photo by Jeanie Lewis

The Good Arts Arcade: Creative retail & maker spaces for lease

In keeping with its mission to support artists and other creative entrepreneurs, Good Arts is in the process of remodeling a street-level storefront into two retail spaces and two artists’ studios, all of which open onto a shared central gallery.

The Arcade will provide affordable space for the making, exhibiting, and selling of a range of creative goods, and foster a supportive community for the makers and sellers.

Flanked by the new Cherry Street Coffee House to the west, and the entrance to ’57 Biscayne Artist Studios to the east, Good Arts Arcade is perfectly situated for creative collaboration, fabulous combined events, and synergistic marketing opportunities. The location is well situated for foot traffic from the nearby light rail station, ferries, Pioneer Square park, and a planned streetcar stop at First and Cherry. A parklet will be installed on the street in front of the entrance, providing additional outdoor community space and a potential pop-up show venue.

We are seeking creative community builders–artists, gallerists, and human-scale retailers–to work, grow, and collaborate in the Arcade.

The spaces will be available September 1 and are still under construction: interior photos will be coming soon. This PDF has a floor plan, square footages, and prices: GoodArtsArcade. Please contact Jane to see the spaces in progress. On First Thursday, August 3, you can get a sneak peek at one of them, when we host Neon Dreamer, an art-meets-video-game pop-up.

opening1

This area, shown with a pop-up show in May 2017, will become the larger of the two gallery spaces.

heather2

The future Arcade as one large space, playing host to the Upstream Music Fest in May 2017.

Getting ready for our new look!

The Good Arts Building is being wrapped in scaffolding this week, in preparation for a major exterior refurbishment. The new colors, designed by Jane Richlovsky with input from other artists of ’57 Biscayne, and approved by the Pioneer Square Preservation Board this past summer, will highlight the unique Victorian decoration on the building’s trim and complement the brick and sandstone facade.

southelevationwebRendering of the Cherry Street elevation of the building.

westelevationwebRendering of the First Avenue elevation.

What’s up with the boxing gloves?

If you were to look up as you walked past the Good Arts Building, you might notice that our flower baskets aren’t hanging from the standard-issue Pioneer Square brackets. Two of the buildings’ owners designed and built these brackets to pay homage to some of the characters and institutions from the building’s colorful history.

Schelles’ Grotto, a notorious speakeasy (and worse) occupied the basement at the turn of the last century; several other saloons existed on the first floor over the years, including the Yankee Clipper Tavern.

Hershberg Men’s Clothiers were among the building’s first tenants; their highly visible signage dominates the corner in early photos.

Wolf’s Good Eats Cafeteria, whose name is emblazoned on the building in photos from the teens (and the inspiration for our name), occupied both second and third floors. The cup also marks the future location of Cherry Street Coffee House!

The Skid Road Theatre (1975-1980) was an important part of Seattle’s (and Pioneer Square’s) theatrical history; actors and directors who went on to shape local professional theatre worked there in their early years.

The 102 Cherry Club (basement, 1940’s) figures prominently in Se- attle jazz history as the club where visiting acts would wind down and play casual, unadvertised sets after public mainstage shows elsewhere. Our future plans involve restoring the basement to a performance space.

The Evergreen boxing gym occupied the third floor in the 1940’s -’60’s. Among the memorable quotes attributed to ts irrepressible proprietor, George Chemeres: “I lived by the sweat of my imagination” – which also happens to be an appropriate motto for the current second-floor occupant, ’57 Biscayne art studios.

An early sketch for the design

An early sketch for the design

discs, welding, steve coulter, pioneer square, good arts

The waterjet-cut steel discs awaiting assembly

clamped

A bracket assembled and ready for welding.

welding

Good Arts co-owner Steve Coulter welding a bracket.