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October 24: Bad Bishop grand opening & ’57 Biscayne industry night

Our newest Good Arts addition, on First Avenue next to Cherry Street Coffee House, Bad Bishop Bar, will open Wednesday, October 24 for cocktails and eats. We’ll keep the secret passage open that same night for ’57 Biscayne’s 100 under $100/Sweet Suite 300 Industry Night and artists’ reception, so guests can pop down for a bite of food, or up for a bite of art.

Wednesday, October 24

110 Cherry Street AND 704 First Avenue (with secret passage!)

’57 Biscayne event is from 5-7; Bad Bishop’s until 9

Congrats to Bad Bishop owner Jesse for this nice write-up in Seattle Met. And to our second-newest retail tenant, Sew Generously, joining H Bailey Boutique vintage menswear in the quest to make the men of Seattle, and anyone else, look fabulous. (108 Cherry in the Arcade)

 

One lovely large studio is available at ’57 Biscayne

In keeping with our mission of making more affordable space creative entrepreneurs of all stripes, we recently renovated our third floor into art studios. Creative work space being at a premium in this town, it took about five minutes for eleven of them to get snatched up. The largest one is still available, and we’re looking for the perfect anchor tenant for this buzzing hive of activity.

It would make a perfect printmaking, photography, or other shared workshop space. Thinking of starting or moving such a venture? Here are some of the many advantages to locating your fabulous maker space in the Good Arts Building:

 

Stability: ’57 Biscayne studios, which occupy the upper floors, encompass an established community of artists.The building, since 2015, has been owned by a partnership that includes artists, and which is committed to providing space to creative tenants as affordably as possible.

 

Location: Centrally located; convenient to buses, light rail, ferries. It’s on the route of the Pioneer Square Art Walk, the oldest one in the country. First-floor retail & restaurants in the building attract foot traffic, from tourists to techies.

 

Community: This is the big one. ’57 Biscayne was founded in 2011 by a group of displaced artists in a tight spot, who found that working together was the best way to survive. Today, twenty-eight studios host a mix of fine, applied, and commercial artists and artisans, young and established, who share ideas, tips, techniques, and business savvy, to their mutual benefit. Collaborative teams have been born here.

 

Vision: In a changing art business landscape, where galleries frequently close and cannot be counted on to support artists financially, an artist-run enterprise that puts artists first is the only way we stand a chance. The Good Arts Building has strong ties to the larger community—tech firms, developers, architects, charitable non-profits—and we’re not afraid to use them to develop new markets and come up with innovative ways for people to purchase art. The Good Arts partners have placed their money, time, and reputations toward keeping the creative class centrally located and thriving in the twenty-first century. And we’re only getting started. (Up next: a theatre in the basement!)

 

Perks of being artist-run: Proper utility sinks, natural (skylights!!) and gallery lighting, and other details that artists know you need. Artists’ schedules are welcome. As are dogs. A lovely hallway gallery for exhibits. A parklet is coming to the Cherry Street side of the building that is a great blank slate for art events, mini-classes, installations, urban gardening, or just hanging out. An Air B&B space is in the works on the property; special rates will be available to tenants’ clients, friends, & family.

 

Visibility: Because of the uniqueness of our vision, the timeliness of our mission, and the unusual nature of the collaboration between an artist and developer (natural enemies in the wild), we’ve received our share of attention in the press. Reporters who have written about us continue to follow and keep in touch, to see where this great experiment will lead.

Photos and other info about the space are on the ’57 Biscayne blog.

Coming May 3: “You Are Here, Too” and a big fat Open House

You Are Here, Too opens Thursday, May 3 at the Good Arts Gallery.

In a city in which the ground has literally shifted several times over the past hundred years from seismic activity and human intervention, and continues to shift through highway projects and rampant development, maps can provide a link to the shared past and a record of the layers underneath.

You Are Here Too, an exhibition of artists’ responses to maps and mapping, opens May 3, 2018, continuing through August 30, at the Good Arts Building in Pioneer Square. The show is divided between two galleries within the building: Good Arts Gallery, inside Cherry Street Coffee House at 700 First Avenue, and ’57 Biscayne Artist Studios, upstairs at 110 Cherry Street (maps provided onsite). You Are Here, Too is co-curated by artists Annie Brule and Jane Richlovsky. Brule is also a cartographer.

Incorporating actual maps, or images, typography, and constructs borrowed from maps, the artworks in the show trace the topography of the natural world, political boundaries, the built environment, slavery, motherhood, and more. Artists working in diverse media—paintings, drawings, layered collages, embroidery, digital media, and ceramics—include David Francis, Nia Michaels, Dara Solliday, Joseph Pentheroudakis, Dawn Endean, Savina Mason, Morgan Cahn, Beverly Naidus, Elizabeth Arzani, Ann Marie Schneider, Hadar Iron, Lindsay Peyton, Warren Munzel, Marie Abando, Ann Marie Schneider, and Karey Kessler.

Like visual art itself, maps are an agreed-upon, yet arbitrary representation of real things; they are abstract metaphors for real places. In a lifetime of experiencing the world through these metaphors, maps and the actual places they represent start to layer themselves on top of one another in the mind of the navigator.

The layering effect is reflected in the very location of You Are Here, Too: Beloved local institution Metsker Maps occupied the footprint of Good Arts Gallery, purveying maps there from 1986-2004. Digging deeper into the layers, the ground on which the building sits was a center of commerce for the Duwamish, and Seattle’s original coastline.

The First Thursday opening reception will be held on May 3, from 6-9 PM, along with our first building-wide open house. Artists’ studios will be open to the public at ’57 Biscayne (110 Cherry), including the new third-floor expansion, and inside the Good Arts Arcade at 108 Cherry. We’ll have live piano music by Victor Janusz in the second-floor lobby.

Image: Orientation / Sand Earth, Ann Marie Schneider; photography, digital media, custom printing technique; limited edition giclee print

The Artist and the Developer

Last spring, UW Professor Jeff Schulman interviewed some of the Good Arts partners for his Seattle Growth Podcast. He hadn’t used much of our material in the original series, (we got pre-empted by the mayor, whatever), but then a couple of days ago Jeff wrote us:
“With all the divisiveness in country, I felt like now was a good time to share the powerful story of the good that can come from approaching challenges and community members with an open mind.”
The story of the Good Arts Building is, literally, A Very Special Episode of the Seattle Growth Podcast:The Artist and the Developer, available on iTunes. It’s a half-hour and very uplifting, even if we do say so ourselves.

Good Arts Building featured on KPLU radio

KPLU reporter Monica Spain visited the Good Arts Building last week to chat with Jane Richlovsky and guest artist Gabriel Campanario about Placiness, the exhibit now on view at ’57 Biscayne on the second floor of Good Arts. Hear or read the story here.

Placiness features artwork inspired by the buildings, history, landscape, and humanscape of Seattle. Paintings, drawings, and photographs directly confronting the cityscape, constructions incorporating materials endemic to the region and more. Through August 28.

Photo of Juan Alonso‘s Town Hall digital prints by Jane Richlovsky

Art Pop-ups (and the party) Continue Through August

Seattle Art Fair has ended, but the party at the Good Arts Building is just getting started. The pop-up galleries we’re hosting in the building, as well as the upstairs art studios, will continue programming cultural wonders through August.

The exhibition Placiness at ’57 Biscayne, upstairs at 110 Cherry, will be on view through August 28, open Fridays & Saturdays 1-6  (and most weekdays but an appointment is recommended). Hours and details here.

La Sala, around the corner at 702 First Avenue, has a full line-up of poetry and music events on the weekends in August, while their visual arts exhibit will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12-5 through August 30. Full schedule at lasalapresentslacocina.com.

Meanwhile, at the Center on Contemporary Art, 106 Cherry, What You See is What You Sweat flips cultural appropriation around and builds relationships between communities of color where whiteness is not the center, through a diverse array of media from video and textiles to paintings and photographs. Through August, Thursdays through Saturdays 1-7.

(photo courtesy La Sala)

Placiness: Art inspired by Seattle

The Good Arts Building is dedicated to preserving space for artists to create in the middle of the city. Most people we talk to agree that it’s a great thing to make sure artists stay in the city. But what about the art they make there? Why do the artists themselves want to stay and make their work in Seattle?

Placiness, an exhibit curated by Good Arts partner Jane Richlovsky, opens August 4 at ‘57 Biscayne on the second floor of the Good Arts Building. The show gathers visual evidence of what it actually means–from the artists’ points of view–to live and work in Seattle, to move about the city and to look at things and people. Featured guest artists include Seattle Sketcher Gabriel Campanario, Juan Alonso, Molly Magai, the late Drake Deknatel and more.

The show will run concurrent with the Seattle Art Fair, August 4-7, at 110 Cherry Street in Pioneer Square. An Artists’ Reception will be held Saturday, August 6 from 5-8 PM. Hours during the fair are First Thursday August 4, 5-8 PM; Fri/Sat. 12-8 PM; Sun. 1-6 PM

In keeping with its mission, Good Arts has signed on as an Event Partner to the Seattle Art Fair, and is hosting a Fair venue downstairs from the studios. In addition, the Good Arts Building is providing storefront space to La Sala Latino/a Artists Network and the Center on Contemporary Art; these groups are independently organizing concurrent events.